BEAT’s Voices of a People’s History Event

Angela Calderon

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In honor of Earth Day, City College’s BEAT club hosted the “Voices of a People’s History” event in the Saville Theatre on April 16, which focused on the environment and land rights.

Bringing Education and Activism Together, or BEAT, is a campus activism club that raises awareness on issues regarding to global citizenship. Its responsibility is to promote student awareness and discussions on related global issues.

The “Voices of a People’s History” event was a tribute to historical events that are related to a superabundance of current events.

“The first thing we need to do is educate ourselves,” a BEAT student said in reference of current global events.

Seven students performed narratives that were written or spoken by an eminent activist throughout history.

While each student recited a narrative at the podium, historical images were displayed on a screen behind them, giving the listener an interpersonal connection with the reader.

Images of signs that read “Defend Human Rights” and “Label GMOs” were displayed, as were pictures of historical strike events on nature, native rights and pesticide elimination.

Pictures of well known activists were on display, such as labor leader and civil rights activist Cesar Chavez, and Rachel Carson, the founder of a global environmental movement.

Before each reading, one of the two student MC’s provided brief background information for each activist narrative that was declaimed.

Seven narratives were recited from activists such as John Muir, the famous naturalist and wilderness advocate, and Winona Laduke, an American Indian activist and environmentalist.

The speeches and writings, some decades old, were brought to life and became instantly connected and relevant to present global issues.

After the students finished with their speeches, the floor was opened for questions.

One audience member asked for suggestions on improving the community.

Many students recommended getting involved with direct action activist organizations on campus or in their communities.

The student club members of BEAT are also involved with other activist programs on campus and throughout San Diego.

For more information on BEAT, visit sdbeatclub.wordpress.com.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email