Supporters of 9/11 ‘Truth’ reach goal

Ernesto Lopez

City College’s chapter of Architects & Engineers for 9/11 Truth announced that more than 1000 building professionals have signed a petition demanding the government hold a new investigation of 9/11.

Supported by several San Diegans for Truth members, City’s AE911 Truth club, led by student Steve Fahrney, was at Gorton Quad Feb. 18 providing hand outs and complimentary DVDs of their investigation which, allegedly, proves that explosives were used to demolish the World Trade Center towers and Building 7.

The video being played at the quad and handed out to students features Architects & Engineers for 9/11 founder Richard Gage and is entitled “9/11: Blueprint for Truth The Architecture of Destruction.”

Gage’s video demonstrates side-by-side examples of controlled demolitions of skyscrapers versus actual video footage of the collapse of the World Trade Towers. It is also the video that has been instrumental in convincing architects and engineers to sign the on-going petition.

According to Gage, the more than 1000 architects and engineers who have signed the petition agree that information presented to the public by the mass media and official government investigators regarding Building 7 contradicts scientific evidence.
“I don’t know who planned (the 9/11 attacks) but there is no evidence that fire brought down the buildings. There must have been explosives planted there months before,” said Aaron Brown, the University of San Diego’s Toreros for Truth president.
Brown added that the explosive residue found at Ground Zero and Building 7 were “high-tech explosives” which are smaller than a human hair.
“Al Qaeda could not have done this because there is no way they had access to these explosives,” he said.
“Osama (Bin Laden) has nothing to do with 9/11. There is not enough evidence to prove he did,” said Paul Holden, a member of San Diegans for Truth. “The government knew it was going to happen; what a coincidence that nobody got injured in Building 7.”

When presented with Gage’s theory, some students remained skeptical, but others entertained the possibility of the government actually being involved in the attacks.

“When it first happened, it was devastating. When I see video of it now, I think, ‘how did it happen that planes hit at the top and explosions happened at the bottom,'” said Amanda Sokimi, a social work student. “There is something iffy about it all. I don’t understand why our government would do this when they are here trying to help Haiti.”

April Mary, a Balboa City High School teacher who was on campus giving her students a tour of the college, said she is not convinced that Gage’s theory is correct.

“I think you can’t come to any conclusions unless you have that type of knowledge,” she said.