Rain or shine, City unites

Mariel Mostacero

Even with a rainy day, The Uprising was still able to host the Club Revolution event Oct. 11 in the cafeteria, opening its doors to other clubs that also participated this year.

“We opened up our events to all the other clubs, and welcomed them in to bring unity to the community,” said Robert Crouse, Club Rising representative and Associated Student Government senator.

The event also became a way to memorialize Diana Gonzalez, a student who was killed on campus two years ago. Other clubs were invited to join in and say their peace about the student, which would work in tandem with the candlelight vigil that was held later that day.

Club Revolution was intended to be more festival-like, with games and live music, but the unexpected rain caused the club to move indoors. Several clubs did cancel because of the weather, but others were more than welcome to stay and did so as Club Revolution was moved indoors.

“Any club that did come, we gave them a chance to honor Diana, talk about their club, and we’re just going to build relationships,” Crouse said.

Groups in attendance included Turning the Hearts Center and Students in Free Enterprise with their “Don’t Be a Bully” campaign. Some groups were from outside campus, like the Turning the Hearts Center, a community based organization.

“In general, the Turning the Hearts Center has over 16 different programs to serve our community, and the Turning Hearts Center is the leader of youth and adult empowerment,” said Turning the Hearts Center representative Isaac Lewis.

The organization has been building a relationship with City College, along with other groups in attendance that were hoping to participate in more in school-related events.

Club Uprising itself has community ties, as Abraham Camacho, youth director of the National City base for the Christian group. The youth director and his group helped coordinate the event as well, keeping in close contact with the school and promoting Club Rising in general. As a Christian group, their views are focused on positivity and unity rather than spreading their beliefs.

“Our main goal is to play a positive influence on people, because we believe they get bombarded with negativity every day. With us, we try to do what we can to bring encouragement to their lives,” Camacho said.