Prop. 30 breathes life into City’s classes

Tristen Fernane

A new class schedule was released online Nov. 8 for the spring semester. It was originally held back only to be released a couple of days after the election, pending the outcome of Prop. 30. 
San Diego City College President Terrence Burgess explained that the passing of Prop. 30 saved 70 to 80 sections from being cut, meaning that 1,300 classes were not removed.
“The passage of Prop. 30 from our perspective was huge because the impact of it not passing would’ve been a massive mid-year budget reduction for the whole community college system,” said Burgess. 
Burgess went on to say that if Prop. 30 hadn’t passed the deductions would have been drawn out over the next three semesters. This would have meant that district-wide an estimated 4,000 students would have been turned away.
“City is about 10,000 so that would be about 40 percent the enrollment of City that would of had to be turned away,” Burgess explained. 
The passing of Prop. 30 saved the class selection and the enrollment amount allowed here at City.
The classes that benefited extremely from the proposition passing were the electives. Burgess said the main goal was to protect the core classes. Now that Prop. 30 has passed, the class schedule will have more variety instead of the bare minimum that students need.
In the last five years, the district lost about $4 million dollars from reductions.
“Prop. 30 passed and that tends to stabilize us and gave us a little bit of a boost up again but we still will have all that money we lost in the last five years,” Burgess said. 
Prop. 30 is a step up and Burgess said he has been speaking with people in Sacramento who have been following the issue closely.
“It will probably be at least 10 more years before community colleges come back to where they were before the massive budget cuts started back in 2007 and eight,” he said.