Editorial

Heric Rubio

Christmas. Hanukkah. Kwanza. Many people celebrate many different things at this time of year. Unfortunately, many people also get hung up on these terms and argue about what is politically correct to say and what can and can’t be written on store windows.

They argue that saying “Merry Christmas” leaves out all the poor Jewish children or forcing someone to learn about why a menorah gets lit is anti-Christian. And forget about Kwanza.

Ask any child, or adult for that matter, and more than likely they’ll know nothing about it. History lesson: It’s a celebration that begun in 1966 in order to give African-Americans an alternative to the already established holidays where they could celebrate their heritage and culture.

All this bickering causes people to forget what the true meaning of the season is. They get so caught up in what it should be called and forget about what it represents.

While giving should be a year round thing, this time of year is set aside specifically for that reason. To remember that there are others out there much less fortunate than yourself.

Whatever troubles you may be going through, whatever drama, debt or dilemma you may be suffering through, more than likely there is someone out there going through a worse time.

So please, take this time and reflect on that. Make some time to help someone that could use it. Visit a soup kitchen, spare some change or just make yourself available to someone that may be alone during what should be a joyful time of year.

We’re not children anymore. It’s time we stop asking for things and start giving them instead.