Knights stand up against cuts

Donovan Terblanche

The athletics department along with other San Diego City College students met to protest the budget cuts affecting the school on Sept. 9 on B Avenue. Mesa students came from their campus as well to let their voices be heard.

” I am thrilled by the turnout and the enthusiasm, and at the same time I am proud of the students,” said the Chancellor of San Diego Community College District, Dr. Constance M. Carroll.

According to Sergeant Mirakian of the City College police, several officers were bought in from Mesa and ECC as a precautionary measure along with two plainclothes officers.

“We do not expect any trouble” he said, and at the end of the rally noted that “nothing had happened”.

The sports department, which has been affected, let its voice be heard in an attempt to let the governing officials know that these budget cuts are affecting the students.

“Athletics is a huge asset to the City College campus, as evidence in the winning men’s basketball team of spring 09,” said Cathy McGinnis, the athletics director.

Jennifer Aaoe, the athletics councilor, explained, “student athletes in order to transfer to 4 year institutions need their full 60 units. The current situation is preventing students from any hope of obtaining a Fulbright scholarship in order to meet the NCAA requirements”.

According to the District Resource Office, the cutbacks have been across the board, and every sports activity has been cut by 10 percent, with limited tournaments and contests.

At City College, enrollment is up 4 percent. The head count at City, Mesa and Miramar community colleges is up.

The fill rate now stands at 95 percent up from the average of 80 percent; all classes at the three colleges are full, with 59 percent of those waitlisted classes full.

There are 20,000 waitlisted requests for this semester, which is an increase of 50 percent.

The schools are seeing 10,000 new or first time students who could not get at least one of their required or wait listed classes.

There has been a 7 percent reduction in sections offered and 300 classes have been eliminated.

One of the most unfortunate results of this has been that 1 out of 3 of the students could not get their required class for a transfer or for their required job training.