To allow love or not to allow love

LaShawn Encarnacion

Is it right that gays are prevented from getting married? Moreover, is it right to use religion as the reason why?

This remains one of today’s hottest debates and while there are pros and cons to gays being married one thing is clear: The fact remains that gays want to get married because they love each other.

It may be a love that most choose not to comprehend but to deny gays the right to express their love as the rest of the world can is as harsh as discrimination against African-Americans before the Civil War.

The prejudice on gay marriage stints from a vast majority of religious groups, stating in Genesis 1:27-28: “So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. And God blessed them …”

I can respect their wishes and beliefs, but what about these in between steps that are taken, like living together or separating before a divorce is final. Well in the same bible, Matthew 19:9 quotes, “And I say to you: whoever divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality and marries commits adultery.”

So many examples of separations and people who commit adultery just to set up for divorce, and yet they protest to the core that gays should not get married.

A close friend of mine had gone through a divorce himself and while he didn’t cheat on his wife until the divorce was final, there was still the separation. Another friend of mine, cheated on her husband and was sleeping around with a couple other men even before the divorce documents were drafted, yet another who protests consistently that gays should never be married.

So Is it right that they can protest something against the bible when they are committing acts against the bible?

Our society tries to avoid change but it is inevitable and acceptable.

Gay marriage is becoming more acceptable in the world.

On May 7, Delaware became the 11th state to officially allow gay marriages to be performed legally, joining Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Iowa, Maine, Maryland and Washington and Washington D.C.

Gay marriages can work and have worked.

While the old school meets the new school way of thinking, living and believing it can at times tear families apart.

My late cousin, Vicente Torrez, automatically comes to mind. When he decided to tell his “extremely traditional Catholic” parents about his gay lifestyle, it took them years and his coming down with the AIDS for them to realize that their son was their son regardless of his choice.

“Coming out” is one of the toughest decisions for a person who is gay to make because of the judgments that await them. But in recent years, the culture of the U.S as a whole is changing and being gay is so much more accepted as opposed to 20-30 years ago when all they could do is mask the lifestyle by forcing themselves to date straight, all the while, living in a lie that was not making their life complete.

Gay marriages maybe still a hot topic but it’s not as taboo as people are trying to play it in the headlines and in the communities of this nation.

More and more communities are embracing the lifestyle, not accepting it but rather embracing and tolerating it. It just goes to show that all should be allowed to love and to show displays of that love.

Marriage is the ultimate sign of love, and everyone, no matter their sexual orientation, should have the right to express that love by marrying whoever they want.