“Pelo Malo” showcased at Subir center

Film centered around cultural issues.

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“Pelo Malo” showcased at Subir center

Pelo Malo was shown at the Subir center on Thursday. Photo by Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle

Pelo Malo was shown at the Subir center on Thursday. Photo by Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle

Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle

Pelo Malo was shown at the Subir center on Thursday. Photo by Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle

Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle

Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle

Pelo Malo was shown at the Subir center on Thursday. Photo by Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle

Melisa Cabello-Cuahutle, News Editor

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The Dreamer Resource Center showcased the movie “Pelo Malo” (Bad Hair) last Thursday, presenting themes of racism, poverty and homophobia.

The movie follows a kid named Junior who has curly hair, also known in the film as bad hair.  Set in Venezuela, Junior struggles with the relationship he has with himself and his hair, as well as the relationship with his mother.

“And if I cut my hair?” Junior asks in the film, while his mother packs his clothes, sending him to live with his grandmother.

Throughout the film Junior’s mother rejects him. It is later shown that she is disturbed by his obsession with his hair, which she considers gay and therefore detrimental, ultimately failing to connect with her own son. “I don’t love you,” Junior says to his mother. “I don’t either,” Junior’s mother replies.

“I didn’t really get it at first but after seeing the relationship between the mom and the son, it came together a little bit more,” said audience member Elidia Gonzalez.

She also said that the grandmother, a character who often expressed love and desire to live with Junior, was concerned about him and what could happen if the mother didn’t “watch out.”

Although the film focused mainly on racism and homophobia it also mentions themes of gender roles, poverty and the uncertainty in Venezuela.

The film was screened at the AH building, in one of the Subir centers.

Although the room had enough space for over 30 people to sit, the event only brought a few people. Program Activity Manager Dr. Angélica González wasn’t expecting a big turnout due to the time of the event, but said that they sometimes coordinate with classes and that those events bring a bigger audience.

The Subir center is located in the AH building and often displays films for students to enjoy. These movie events are free and students are welcome to come and go during the screening.

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